Tag Archive for: William C. Chittick

Love in Islamic Thought – William C. Chittick

Abstract:

Western studies of Islam have paid relatively little attention to love. Early scholars
were heirs to a long history of European animosity toward this upstart religion and tended to
assume that love was a Christian monopoly. When Muslim writing on love did come to their
attention, they typically considered it peripheral or borrowed, often by classifying it as “Sufi.”
As Carl Ernst explains, “The term Sufi-ism was invented at the end of the eighteenth century, as
an appropriation of those portions of ‘Oriental’ culture that Europeans found attractive.

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Equilibrium and Realization: William Chittick on Self and the Cosmos by Muhammed Rustom

Abstract:

“William Chittick, currently professor of religious studies at the State University of New York (Stony Brook), is an internationally renowned expert on Islamic thought. His contributions to the fields of Sufism and Islamic philosophy have helped paint a clearer picture of the intellectual and spiritual landscape of Islamic civilization from the seventh/thirteenth century onwards. Yet Chittick is not simply concerned with discussions in Islamic thought as artifacts of premodern intellectual history. His vast knowledge of the Islamic intellectual tradition serves as the platform from which he seeks to address a broad range of contemporary issues. In this short essay, I will outline Chittick’s writings on the self within the context of his treatment of cosmology. Rather than being outdated ways of looking at the universe and our relationship to it, Chittick argues that traditional Islamic cosmological teachings are just as pertinent to the question of the self today as they were yesterday.”

Equilibrium and Realization – William Chittick on Self and the Cosmos by Muhammad Rustom

Equilibrium and Realization - William Chittick on Self and the Cosmos by Muhammad Rustom

Themes of Love in Islamic Mystical Theology by William Chittick

Abstract:

“Muslim scholars who talked about love agreed that it is indefinable. In discussions of human love, they typically limited themselves to describing its symptoms, characteristics, and consequences. They summarized these along the lines of “yearning for union.” By using the word union, they were saying that the goal of lovers is to come together, not to stay apart. They understood love as the energy that brings about the encounter of God and man…”

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Rashid al-Din Maybudi’s Tafsir Kashf al-Asrar – Tr. William Chittick

Rashid al-Din Maybudi’s Kashf al-Asrar – Tr. William Chittick

The full name of this commentary is Kashf al-asrār wa ʿuddat al-abrār (“The unveiling of the mysteries and the provision of the pious”). It is the longest Sunni commentary in the Persian language.  Selections translated by William Chittick.